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v7.0 - moving along, a point increase at a time

Multilitteratus Incognitus

Traversing the path of the doctoral degree

The doctoral Winchester plan

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If you've ever seen the movie Shaun of the Dead, a humorous take on the surviving the zombie apocalypse, you are familiar with the Winchester plan.  The Winchester is a local (to the protagonist) pub, and it key to surviving the zombie apocalypse - according to the protagonist, is taking a short skip-and-a-hop to the local pub (after doing a couple of short tasks) and waiting for help to arrive while imbibing their drink of choice. Surviving the zombie apocalypse is a breeze!  Well, it's not that simple to survive the zombie apocalypse - as the protagonist finds out!

The past semester has been a little difficult (mostly due to over-committing on my part) and that has affected my own desired progress through my doctoral program.  The classes and the seminars are done (yay!). The next step is the dissertation proposal (which is in draft form).  In the past few days I've been thinking about my progress in all its wonderful variety which includes slow progress, lack of progress thereof, stopping to smell the roses the academic roses, academically procrastinating, and taking trips down academic rabbit holes that call to the academic sailors to their doom like attractive sirens. This has made me realize that, like Shaun - the protagonist of the movie (hey, it's a good movie, go see it if you haven't!), I too had my own Winchester plan to making it through my doctoral studies.

My plan did not include a pub, or waiting with a drink until someone came and conferred upon me the title of doctor.  It did, however, include some misconceptions about the process.  I think that conceptually I knew what the dissertation was about (basically a long, five part, [research] essay).  I thought I had enough practice in all of the individual parts - the methods section, the literature review, the writing up of the findings, the APA format.  Before I got into a doctoral program I had authored, and co-authored, and co-researched, papers which got published in peer reviewed academic journals.  I thought that the dissertation would be more of the same.

This turned out to be a bit of a challenge because academic journals have a 6000-9000 word limit, so a lot get cut out and left on the cutting room floor.  Or, you just choose what to put in from the start, knowing that you have a limited space to work with, so that you don't have to cut a lot. A dissertation on the other hand is (or seems to be) much more exhaustive. A demonstration of what you know rather than a simple demonstration of an argument that you are setting forth. Much like Shaun, I found out that my previous skill set - while it would help somewhat in the zombie dissertation apocalypse, I would find it hard, I would be more challenged than I thought I would be.  Much like Shaun I am to make it to the end though, and I will end up in a pub after the dissertation is successfully defended to celebrate. Now I just need to find my way back to the path and avoid the zombies that drain my time and energy - and focus on the dissertation!


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EDDE 806: Epilogue (of reboots and alternative universes)

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I guess this is my "806 is dead, long live 806!" post ;-) 

One of the final requirements for EDDE 806 is to:
Create a final blog post linking to the 6 earlier posts and providing a final reflection, feedback and any recommendations on the course as a whole.

For those who are keeping score at home, other course requirements included the following:
  • Present a 30-45 minute presentation on their proposal or dissertation work and progress and respond to comments and questions.
  • Post reactions and reflections on at least 6 of the presentations (over one or more semesters) using a response template created by the instructor, to their blog in the Athabasca Landing (tagged with EDD 806)
  • Attend and participate in discussion in at least 6 sessions over one or two semesters of the course
I am not really sure what a final reflection really looks like for 806, especially considering that I will most likely attend quite a few sessions next fall when the remainder of my cohort will be presenting their in-progress proposals.  So, I thought that doing a reflection on the EdD program up to now would be worthwhile, and proposing a new way of pacing the program, and in the process something about 806 might come of it.

It seems hard to believe that about three years ago (give or take a month) I had just been accepted to the EdD program at Athabasca University (the stomping grounds of Anderson, Dron, Siemens, Cleveland-Innes, and another researchers I had been reading the work of in the years preceding my application to this university), and I had submitted my program fee payment to matriculate.  Three years, and nine AU courses later I am plugging away at my dissertation proposal.  If you are wondering what those 9 courses are:
  • 6 compulsory courses (EDDE 801, 802, 803, 804, 805, 806)
  • 2 optional courses (MDDE 701, 702)
  • 1 course in which I was a teaching assistant/intern (MDDE 620), for the "Greek cohort" no less :-) 
As with any good program, program creators take into account feedback received from a variety of sources and the program improves (for example the 2 optional courses started becoming available as my cohort was rolling in).   This proposed timeline from matriculation to graduation is what I would have done the same, and differently, if I were to go back in time:

Spring 2014 (same as the original timeline)
  1. Accepted! Woohoo!
  2. Enrolled
  3. Got books mailed to me (nice job, AU!)
  4. May 2014 - "welcome to the program" online adobe connect session with the cohort and select faculty.  Placed in pre-selected groups to work on Assignment 1 (due when we meet in August in Edmonton)
Summer 2014 (same as the original timeline)
  1. June-July: meet with Marc, Renate, and Steph (cohortmates) online -a few times to work on assignment 1
  2. June-July: read through textbook, and download PDFs from course site.
  3. August: meet in Edmonton, meet cohort-mates in person, polish assignment, present assignment.
Fall 2014 (somewhat similar to what I did in the original timeline)
  1. EDDE 801 (Advanced Topics and Issues in Distance Education)
    1. Weekly live sessions for class
    2. Weekly guests from the field of distance education (woot!)
  2. EDDE 806. 
    1. Peruse through the recent recorded sessions and listen to two. 
    2. No need for reflective posts --> Get feet wet, see what other cohorts are doing, ideate on own work. Maybe in final 801 session students share their ideas from having viewed 2 recordings.
Spring 2015
  1. EDDE 802 (Advanced Research Methods in Education)
    1. Bi-weekly live session for class
  2. EDDE 806 
    1. Attend 2 sessions during the weeks 802 didn't meet. 
    2. Reflect on 1 presentation (live or recorded)
Summer 2015
  1. MDDE 702 (qualitative refresher for those who need a refresher)
  2. Start brainstorming on your proposals.  Jot down big research questions, diagram some potential research methods for them,  and write brief abstracts about the problem to be solved. This is sort of like a TV show elevator pitch.  Be ready to pitch 3 ideas.
  3. Go back to 802 materials and see them in light of your pitches
Fall 2015
  1. EDDE 803 (Teaching and Learning in Distance Education)
    1. Bi-weekly class sessions
    2. Tackle topics on teaching and learning.  
    3. Does anything from course seem to connect to your 3 pitches?  File it!
    4. Intern in an MDE class
  2. EDDE 806 
    1. Attend 2 live sessions (during weeks when 803 does not meet)
    2. Reflect on two sessions (either live or recorded that semester)
    3. Present your top 3 pitches and receive feedback from audience in one of the live sessions
    4. Continue refining your 3 pitches based on feedback (this task crosses into spring 2016)
Spring 2016
  1. EDDE 804 (Leadership and Project Management in Distance Education)
    1. Bi-Weekly sessions
    2. Tackle topics on leadership.  
    3. Does anything from course seem to connect to your 3 pitches?  File it!
  2. EDDE 806
    1. Attend 2 live sessions (during weeks when 804 does not meet)
    2. Reflect on two sessions (either live or recorded that semester)
    3. Pitch 2 expanded ideas (expanded in terms of what type of literature you might look into, and updated ideas about methodology and problem)
Summer 2016
  1. MDDE 701 (Quantitative research refresher for those that need it)
  2. Pick one of your pitches and develop a literature review (due at the beginning of 805)
  3. Pick one of your pitches and develop a preliminary intro (due at the beginning of 805)
Fall 2016
  1. EDDE 805
    1. Bi-weekly class meetings
    2. Polish off a draft of your proposal that includes summer deliverables + methods
  2. EDDE 806
    1. Attend 2 live sessions
    2. Reflect on two sessions (either live or recorded that semester)
Spring 2017
  1. EDDE 806
    1. Attend 6 live sessions
    2. Reflect on 4 live sessions
    3. Present your proposal
Summer 2017
  1. Polish off proposal
  2. Connect with your cohort over the summer (support network)
Fall 2017
  1. Defend Proposal & start Research

So, what are the differences between what I did and what I wish I had done (and what was an option?) I had dipped my toes in 806 when I started in 801; I was curious, and since the course was open to anyone, why not? But, once 802 kicked in, it was difficult to keep up, so I was on-and-off in 806 throughout the program (more off than on, until 805).  Despite the on-and-off nature I ended up reflecting on some of the sessions before I officially signed up for the course (hence the number of posts at the end).   I think that 806 was originally conceived as a course to keep the band together in some formal manner while we're all off doing our own thing, but I think that the strength of 806 is really in being a connecting strand (on the program side) from start to end.  I think being part of 806 from the start can help future cohorts conceptualize what they want to do, see what others are doing, and know that for proper execution of the dissertation lots of planning needs to go into it (and we can all commiserate at our setbacks, and celebrate our victories). I think this is important to see early on.

In terms of Summer terms, summer is definitely a good time to kick back, relax, have a few beers in the garden while reading your favorite fiction...but in all honesty two weeks off would be have been fine, and then we should have been on the path again.  Coming from a US background, I am used to the term ending at the end of May. AU's early start and early end of the spring (Winter) semester meant that I had boatloads of free time.  This dissertation won't write itself and I think that the summers (Mid-April through August) are a good time to do it in a structured (cohort driven, program driven) way.  Summers can be a time when you work on your elevator pitch for some ideas - and you can present them in 806 (during your second year) to see what might stick - you can also get feedback and things to think about.  During the summer of year 2 you can spend those 4 months in doing a lit-review and an introduction (2 chapters!), and be ready to roll in 805 (start of year 3).  I think this plan gets you better positioned to defend at the beginning of year 4.

A potentially controversial issue might be the requirements for 806. At the moment it's an attend 6 and reflect on 6 setup.  My proposal is attending and/or viewing 14 sessions (as opposed to 6), reflecting on more sessions overall, but you'd have the freedom to reflect on some recorded ones - in case the live session wasn't something you could really say something about; and EDDE 806 is more integrated into the entire EdD process.  Of course, this means that 805 + 806 (Research Seminar I & II) would need to be tweaked, but I think that the end goal would be better.

So, what do other EdD folks think?  Does this work for you?


Post TitleReflection
& Live attendance
Reflection
from Recording
Own
Presentation
Post I - On prepping for a dissertation






























Totals:
10
4
1
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EDDE 806 - Post XIII - It's the end of the semester, and I feel fine

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Alright folks!  That's a wrap for EDDE 806 for this semester!  The semester went out with a bang with three members of my cohort presenting their dissertation proposal work in progress (and for those on the east coast the session was a little long - after a long day - but well worth it!).

The three proposed research projects are  Kim's, titled "Student Satisfaction Levels among Canadian Armed Forces Members toward their distance learning experiences" which deals with Canadian armed forces training and distance education; Rosemarri's , titled "Transforming Learning in Higher Education: Implementing UDL in Higher Education"; and Scott's, titled  "College Leadership and Distance Learning"

There were some common themes between these three presentations, and presentations that have been done previously in the semester, be it underlying reasons for the research, methodologies employed, or potential timelines.  Having seen the timelines of friends from Cohort 6 (and to some extent from Cohort 5), I can say that I've certainly revised my own timeline to a much more realistic expectation (how does 2019 sound?).

Going back to some common threads,  Kim discussed a little bit about the training costs associated with the CAF (approximately $1.3B Canadian per year).  I am not sure what the size of the CAF is, but I was wondering how much is that amortized per member of the CAF; not that every member of the CAF will have an equal dollar amount of training spent on them, but it was a thought.  The thing that really stood out for me was the story about officer training and how a member of the CAF can spend 1 year in residence to complete their training, or do it over a period of 2 years via distance education in the field (because Distance Ed is considered by the brass less rigorous and hence you have to have more).  It's interesting to see such (unfounded) biases alive not just in academia (my playground) but also in other places.  This question isn't really related to Kim's research (which is survey research) but I'd love to see a compare and contrast of the on-campus officer training vs the online version. They should have equal outcomes, but I am wondering what the pros/cons are for each modality.

Another presentation (Scott's) dealt more with college leadership and the adaptation of colleges in Canada to distance education. The idea behind this research is to look at leadership variables that promote growth of distance education at the university president level.  The underlying  rationale here (at least one of points) was that the role of the university is changing, and the university must adapt or go extinct. Scott quoted O'Meara who said that Higher Education as it is found to be "irretrievably immersed in a merciless marketplace" (O'Meara).  If I remember correctly Scott is the only person who has presented thus far (from our Cohort) that is doing mixed-methods.

I think the idea of leadership variables promoting growth at the university is important.  Bad leaders do have a chilling effect both to individuals and to the organization as a whole.  That said, the thing that was running through my mind is the framing of the argument.  A lot of what we see today (at least on my side of the border) tends to be about framing higher education in the framework of a market economy: get degree X to do work X, come back often for CPD.  There is, however, in my mind a disjuncture here.  School costs a lot.  Both from a financial aspect and a time aspect (not to mention any emotional aspects). Education isn't a new pair of jeans you buy every other season. Adapting to a market economy (IMHO) isn't what institutions of higher education should be doing.  We should be innovative, but the evolve or die out framing doesn't work well for this particular sector of life and society.

As an aside, in the chat  Norine wrote a paper called "Adult learning theories: shows that hurt the feet" - LOL.  Now I am curious to read that paper.  I am not sure how this came up, but it must have been in someone's lit review :-)

That's all for this season of EDDE 806 :-) See you in the fall!
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EDDE 806 - Post XII - Of Navigators and Succession...

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Last evening we had our penultimate EDDE 806 session for this season. On tap for the evening we had Neera's presentation (originally of Cohort 6, but now firmly "one of our own" in cohort 7), and a presentation by Stephanie.

One question that came to mind, outside of the context of these presentations, was how long do EdD students stick around in 806 after they have met the requirements of the course?  If they don't come back, why is that?  If they do return, why do they return, and what influences their regularity of participation?  I guess this could be a dissertation topic in and of itself, but it's a question that came to mind as I saw some very familiar names in the guest list on Adobe connect last night, and noticed the absence of other names that I've seen over the last year or so of my 'informal' 806 participation.  Of course, a dissertation topic like this would most likely add 2-3 years to my studies, and that doesn't seem like an appealing prospect :p

For the presentations of the evening, Neera presented on her proposed study, titled Succession planning in higher education: condition for sustainable growth and operational resilience, and Stephanie's proposed research topic is titled Developing routine practices for health system navigation in Canada.  Neera is focusing succession planning, with a focus on Polytechnics (with potential study participants coming from Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and British Columbia.  I was surprised that there are Community Colleges in Canada - I tend to think of community colleges as a US term.  Looking little community college might be one of many terms that refers to the same type of institution in Canada.

In any case,  I think that Neera made an interesting point, and something that I've seen at my own institution: In higher education it often seems that hiring new people at the institution, or replacements for key positions, takes a lot of time.  That ends up potentially costing the institution money because there isn't someone in the position to take care of the critical needs for that institution; and if someone is hired but the search fails (bad fit for example) it's still money down the drain.  Hence a good succession plan (implemented well) would conceivably benefit the institution.

For Stephanie's presentation, since I am not in the healthcare field, I am a little less able to say something other than it's a cool project :-) I don't want to just summarize her presentation though.  The thing that struck me, both with Stephanie's presentation and Neera's (and other presentations I've seen over the years) is that most dissertations and dissertation proposals seem to be either Qualitative in nature or Mixed Methods, but I have yet to see a strictly Quantitative approach just yet.  I wonder if others have seen those in their experiences in EDDE 806.
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EDDE 806 - Post XI - Get your Waldorf on...

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Statler & Woldorf, muppet critics
This past week the presenter of the week was Angie Parkes of Cohort 3, who is a fellow instructional designer!  Angie was presenting to us  her (potential?) dissertation proposal which as to do  with testing the hypothesis that the DACUM process can be done effectively online.  More specifically, her three hypotheses are that (1) an online asynchronous DACUM can produce a comprehensive and rigorous competency analysis; (2) the online asynchronous DACUM can be completed in less than 6 months (2 financial quarters); and (3) the online asynchronous DACUM can be completed for less than $1000.

Angie is coming at this problem from a corporate instructional design lens, where a lot of money is spent in corporate environments for training, however 50%-90% of this training is deemed ineffective.  Because of this training departments are one of the first things that get cut when a company needs to tighten the budget (explains a lot of the angst that friends who are corporate IDs feel).  I do wonder though what about corporate training makes it ineffective.  Being a bit of a Waldrof (or am I more of a Statler?), it seems to me that fellow instructional designers in corporate settings do what's expected of them to do (self-paced, drill & kill interventions), but those don't work because they are usually compliance (and everyone seems to hate that).  If instructional designers were more integral in the talent development cycle, the interventions might be more effective.  Anyway, I think I digress.

So, one might ask, what is DACUM?  DACUM was new for me, and it is defined as:
Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) is a process that incorporates the use of a focus group in a facilitated storyboarding process to capture the major duties and related tasks included in an occupation, as well as, the necessary knowledge, skills, and traits.  This cost-effective method provides a quick and thorough analysis of any job.   
It seems to me to be one of the tools used by instructional designers in the needs analysis phase to determine what is needed to be accomplished by the learning intervention. Apparently DACUM is only done in person at the moment, which can be quite expensive when done face to face, and synchronously, for the same reason that training is deemed expensive at times: you need to pull employees away from their work to do this thing.  Angie is looking at employing Design Based Research (DBR) with a Delphi approach. Her expert informants will be 6 PhD Psychometricians at her company, distributed over a geographic distance (some are in the same office, but some are not). She will have one group of senior psychometricians and one group of junior psychometricians (it will be interesting to see if there are differences between those who are more senior).

On another note, it's interesting that this is not Angie's first idea.  She's had several over the years, but opportunities dry up and doctoral students are left trying to pick up the pieces.  I often wonder what happens if you've passed your dissertation proposal defense (and hence you are formally an EdD candidate), but that opportunity dries up and you need to do something else.  Does you committee ask you to re-defend something new?  Do you try to salvage what you have with what little is left?  Do you put together a new proposal with just your advisor?  With coursework it's pretty cut and dry - you do the work, you get a good grade, you pass.  The dissertation can be a year long project (or longer) after you defend the proposal.  What happens when stuff hits the fan when you're in the thick of it?

If any cohort 1 or cohort 2 folks are reading this, advice is definitely welcomed :-)
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EDDE 806 - Post X - it marks the spot!

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This past Thursday we had our official EDDE 806 session (on Monday, Norine did a mock proposal defense, which I wasn't able to attend, but luckily it's archived for later viewing). In any case, in this session we heard from Renate who reported in on her ideas for a dissertation topic, and there were a ton of interesting things about process that were shared by Susan and others.

Renate is looking to do a study in order to understand the lived experience of pre-licensure (nursing?) students, attending their final clinical practicum, after they have been exposed to an IPE (interprofessional education) didactic curriculum. To do this she will use a qualitative, phenomenological, approach to her research design.  Phenomenology seems to be quite popular between the current cohorts (wonder why). She aims to get about 15 participants from a variety of healthcare professions (in Canada) who will be her research participants.  I am looking forward to reading this research when it's done. It reminds me a little of other professions where there is professional education, but we haven't necessarily seen if the former students practices connect with what they have learned, and how well those connect.

In terms of tips for the dissertation process (and the proposal process for that matter), Susan and Peggy Lynn shared the following (my comments are in italics):

  • Getting yourself in a routine.  Even if you are not doing much on your proposal (or you dissertation), do spend 10-15 minutes on the document anyway.  Re-read, copy edit, make notes. Just keep the process going, even if you're not actively working on it. I have not been doing this this semester, but I think that next week I'll start.  Maybe grab a cup of coffee and spend 15 minutes editing (and look at what Debra commented on from EDDE805, lol)
  • Once the changes to your dissertation (or dissertation proposal) are made (based on the committee feedback) and you have an oral defense scheduled, do not edit the document, not even copy edit!  The committee will use this document as a reference when they quiz you, so it's best if you are all on the same page.
  • Once you pass your dissertation proposal, make a copy of the proposal file for archival purposes.  File it away (I would add, maybe in PDF format!). Then take another other copy to build out your dissertation from.  This is good versioning practice, and it allows us to share successful proposals with other cohort members who might want to see a sample of what is good.
  • The runtime for a defense is about 2 hours.  There are three members on the committee, and the order for questioning is: 1) External member, 2) other member from AU, and 3) your supervisor.  Each gets about 15 minutes of Q&A.  Your presentation at the start of this is 20 minutes, so I guess it's good to practice the heck out of our presentation to make sure that we are on the mark with the points we want to make, and on time!
  • The examiners need to see your face when you start your dissertation to verify visually that it is you defending.  So...make sure that you wear appropriate clothing and present a professional environment. Also make sure that if you are at home that cats, dogs, birds, and rodents are somewhere else and that they don't provide their own soundtrack to your defense
  • Finally, a good point by Peggy Lynn: look for articles that are reporting on the opposite thing that you are proposing. This stuff might come up in your defense so you need to know how to rebut it!


By the way, if you are reading this, and you are in one of the cohorts, please feel free to add to this wiki page. We are putting together a list of topics that we are all working on  (or have worked in, in the case of previous cohorts) for our dissertations.  This will give others in future cohorts (as well as our own) what people have worked on in the past :-)


And, since it was a phenomenology sort of talk... for your learning pleasure, the muppets!


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EDDE 806 - Post IX - About that 'in-process' presentation...

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Yesterday evening I presented where I currently am in my dissertation proposal.  I am not sure if Susan was joking or not about 2, 3, 4 years being the 'in process' time to get a dissertation done and defended, but I certainly hope that it's not that long!  I am aiming for May 2019 at the latest for mine.

That said, earlier this week I did a few dry runs for the presentation I did last evening, and one of them I recorded.  From a timing perspective it's in the ballpark of what I was aiming for (23 minutes).  I have heard that dissertation proposal defenses and dissertation defenses (the presentation portion) are about 20-30 minutes so I wanted to keep that in mind.  This recorded version is a little rough (it was a try out after all), but it gives you an idea of what my current thoughts are on the matter.

What do you think?  I know it's just a window into the mind of this project, but any thoughts would be helpful as I am drafting this beast :)

As an aside, one lesson learned last night is this: hound your advisor, hound your committee, keep on them.  If you are waiting for feedback, go after it like there is no tomorrow ;-)



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EDDE 806 Post VIII - Do Vulcans have emotional presence in the CoI?

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Young Spock at school
And we're off!

The semester has begun, and this time I am "official" in EDDE 806, which means this is my last credit-bearing semester (after that I guess I will be an academic vagabond looking for completion of my own research).

Last night none of our cohort presented (although that would have been an achievement if someone brave enough wanted to do it!).  Instead, a more seasoned EdD student, Lynne Rabak (Cohort 6?) presented on what she is working on as part of her dissertation proposal. The title of Lynne's presentation was "Cognitive and emotional presence: learning effects," and she is looking (or proposing to look) at the interaction and interplay between cognitive presence and emotional presence.

I have to say that I am skeptical of the foundation of the research because I don't fully buy into emotional presence.  I think that affect is an aspect that goes into learning, but I don't know if it warrants its own presence.  From my own readings on emotional presence (albeit limited readings) I don't know why it would warrant its own presence and I am not sure how much of an impact it really has in learning (in a generalizable way; not that I am aiming for generalization in my own dissertation proposal).  Perhaps it's my inner Vulcan not putting as much stock in emotions in the learning process.

Plutchik was mentioned as an influential researcher and thinker in the field of emotion in the learning, so I've added a mental post-it to look into this researcher sometime in the not so distant future (after I am a little further in my own dissertation work).

Clevelland-Innes and Campbell's work is cited as well. One of the things that jumped out at me was a quote from these two scholars: "emotion must be considered, if not a central factor, at least a ubiquitous, influential part of learning - online and otherwise...In common practice, emotions are examined, seemingly visceral and unconsciously. This is not appropriate in reflective pedagogy designed to bring cognition to consciousness" (2012, p. 285).  I don't disagree (it makes sense, actually), but at what part do we consider emotion?  Do we consider it part of the social? As in, emotion generated because of our interactions with others?  Emotion as part of the cognitive? As in, my frustration at my slow progress in Calculus II in college?  Emotion as part of Actor Network Theory?

What this small trip down the rabbit hole brought to the forefront for me was the limits of Venn Diagrams, and 2D representations of complex processes. The Original CoI Model "works" as a Venn Diagram because each Presence is given equal weight and equal interaction with the other presences.  As soon as you start adding presences you have to think of the interrelationships and the interactions between the different elements; and more importantly for our purposes: how do you demonstrate this on paper, to a committee of experts who are vetting you to be a scholar peer (i.e. graduate with your EdD or PhD)? So one aspect is the theory, the other is the explanation of such theory.

Interestingly enough Norine (who I don't think I've met before) mentioned some research done previously, which she was a part of,  with an n of approximately 1200 students (over a period of three years).  The results of this (unpublished) research seemed to indicate that Cognitive Presence and Emotional Presence could stand on their own, whereas Social Presence and Teaching Presence could not.  Social Presence was hypothesized to be a subset of the other three.  Emotional and Cognitive Presences seemed to be about the same level of significance whereas Teaching Presence smaller seemed to be smaller.  This ties in neatly with the limits of 2D diagrams to explain complex processes.  This was quite an interesting discussion (and it would have been nice to have seen the findings of this study published somewhere).  Tonight's session, and Lynne's topic, definitely got me thinking (despite not quite buying fully into Emotional Presence).

Thoughts?
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New Year's resolution...

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Happy new year to all!

I thought I would start my new year with a little (PhD) humor...


While I don't think I'll be graduating by the end of 2017 (wouldn't that be nice?) I would like to make considerable headway with my dissertation.  This coming term (in 8 days, in-fact!) my spring semester (or as they call it in Canada "winter term") will begin.  This coming winter term I am doing my final (final! and I mean it!) course/seminar/structured thinking time for my doctoral work.  EDDE 806.  The overview of the course is a little outdated (although I won't ding the web folks for that because I find some outdated verbiage on my work's website too!  Sometime's it's like a game a whack-a-mole).

In any case, EDDE 806 is described as:

This Doctoral seminar course is designed to provide informal support and opportunities for presentation and peer review of activities associated with completion of the doctoral dissertation.  Completion of the course is required prior to graduation for all doctoral students. Students may register in the course only after passing the candidacy exam. The course is seminar based and will consist of registered students who are actively working on their dissertation.  Other EdD students may participate in the course as guests on a voluntary basis and are encouraged to do so. The format is real time web conferencing seminars held every two weeks during the fall and winter terms. Besides student presentations, faculty and guest presentations will be scheduled. The seminar is designed to allow participation and build networks among all EdD cohorts and graduates.
I have not yet passed my candidacy exam (which at Athabasca means passing your dissertation proposal defense), but due to recent regulation changes I am able to be in the seminar even if I am not done with that part.  

Hence my goal, to be achieved by December 30th 2017 is this: Complete my dissertation proposal to a degree that is passable and successfully defend it.  

Ideally I'd like to have this thing wrapped up by September so I can begin working on data collection and analysis, but I don't know how feasible that is given that I am scheduled to teach 2 courses in the summer (June-August) and the spring semester is looking busy with collaborations.  Still, I expect to be making some meaningful headway with this project during the spring and the summer.  Having organized my collected readings today I can say that I have 205 academic articles download and ready to read (excluding duplicates), some dozen or so blogs and news stories (background info), and 5 books on research methods and ethics. I think the articles will lead me to more articles that I will need to look up.  So... 205 articles - does that sound doable between now and July? ;-)

In addition to EDDE 806, I am also auditing MDDE 701.  That course  is more about quantitative research. While I don't really expect my dissertation to go the quantitative route, I am keeping the mixed methods approach open, and quantitative knowledge is good to have anyway. 

When I started this degree I was hoping for a 4 year end-to-end, but increasingly it's looking like it's going to take me 5 years. That said, I'd prefer to take a little longer but take the time to smell the metaphorical roses on the way and take part in interesting collaborations.

So, what are your learning or academic goals for 2017?

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Anatomy of a winter break

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Happy winter break to everyone!  Classes are over and I guess I am supposed to start working on my candidacy exam...  This comic seems like it applies ;-)


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